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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

1 edition of Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America found in the catalog.

Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America

Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America

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  • 4 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey ; Springfield, VA, National Technical Information Service [distributor] in [Fort Collins, CO] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • North America.,
  • North America
    • Subjects:
    • Shore birds -- Migration -- North America.,
    • Shore birds -- North America -- Geographical distribution -- Maps.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 114-116).

      Statementby Susan K. Skagen ... [et al.].
      GenreMaps.
      SeriesBiological science report,, USGS/BRD/BSR--2000-0003
      ContributionsSkagen, Susan K., Geological Survey (U.S.), U.S. Prairie Pothole Joint Venture.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQL681 .B56 1999
      The Physical Object
      Paginationv, 167 p. :
      Number of Pages167
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL6820610M
      LC Control Number00300162

      Andres, B.A. Population estimates of North American shorebirds, Wader Study Group Bull. 67– Keywords: Shorebird, population size, North America This paper provides updates on population estimates for 52 species of shorebirds, involving 75 taxa, occur-ring in North Size: KB.   Shorebirds, in a nutshell, can be maddening. However, thanks to The Shorebird Guide, they don’t have to remain so. The Shorebird Guide by Michael O’Brien, Richard Crossley, and Kevin Karlson, is a mighty work, nearly pages of concentrated wisdom regarding the 47 domestic and 44 rare, regional, or accidental North American shorebird species.

      In collaboration with others, WCS is working to assess adult survivorship of key shorebird species including as part of a North American Arctic-wide project (Arctic Shorebird Demographics Network) to better understand population trends of shorebirds species of conservation concern. Additionally, research is underway to sample for avian influenza in migrant bird populations as well as determine. As many as , Wilson’s phalaropes and million eared grebes—or a third of their North American populations—come here after nesting to spend weeks or even months putting on weight and molting their feathers before they continue south. For the phalaropes, the next leg of the journey may be a nonstop flight to South America.

        1 thought on “ Catch the Shorebird Migration ” emily Aug at pm. saw all sorts of migrating birds on the Cape this week including: sanderlings, semipalmated plovers, least sandpipers, ruddy turnstones, and a Hudsonian godwit among others. This is done when plumages are significantly different. Numbers refer to species' text blocks on the publication inside pages (see below) and the Quick Reference Chart described above. 47 species of shorebird are included which represents all species collectively known as shorebirds commonly found on the North American continent north of Mexico.


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Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America Download PDF EPUB FB2

Biogeographical Profiles of Shorebird Migration in Midcontinental North America Staging zones are unknown in northern South America during north migration, in the Caribbean basin, or on the. Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America Author: Susan K Skagen ; Geological Survey (U.S.) ; U.S.

Prairie Pothole Joint Venture. Get this from a library. Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America.

[Susan K Skagen; U.S. Prairie Pothole Joint Venture.; Geological Survey (U.S.);]. Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America [Susan K. Skagen] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Buy Biogeographical Profiles of Shorebird Migration in Midcontinental North America by Susan K.

Skagen (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : Susan K. Skagen. Biogeographical Profiles of Shorebird Migration in Midcontinental North America presents the general distribution patterns of en route migrants that refuel in interior wetlands during migration.

The page, "x 11", soft cover report provides information on the spatial and temporal occurrence and habitat requirements for individual species. Biogeographical Profiles of Shorebird Migration in Midcontinental North America By Susan K.

Skagen Peter B. Sharpe1 Robert G. Waltermire M. Beth Dillon U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division Midcontinent Ecological Science Center Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction Transcontinental shorebird migrants are dependentCited by: Biogeographical Profiles of Shorebird Migration.

in Midcontinental North America. Susan K. Skagen Peter B. Sharpe. Robert G. Waltermire. Beth Dillon. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division Midcontinent Ecological Science Center Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction. Transcontinental shorebird migrants Cited by: The first sentence of the introduction to this book says "This is a book about shorebird identification", and I believe it succeeds admirably in that goal.

The two strongest points about the book are that it contains every species that has ever been recorded in North America (94 of them), and the pictures are of very high by: In North America, we generally refer to our seasons as “spring,” “summer,” “fall,” and “winter.” In other areas of the world, particularly those close to the equator, seasons may be divided differently, such as “rainy,” “dry,” or “monsoon.” Timing of Migration The shorebird migration season lasts a long Size: 74KB.

Biogeographical Profiles of Shorebird Migration in Midcontinental North America: Biological Science Report USGS/BRD/BSR, pp. HTTP. Van Horne, B, and P. Sharpe. Effects of tracking by armored vehicles on Townsend’s ground squirrels in the Orchard Training Area, Idaho.

Environmental Management Shorebird Migration A s a group, shorebirds undertake some of the most spectacular of long-distance migrations of any North American birds.

Nearly two-thirds of the species that breed in North America journey from their arctic nesting grounds to winter in Central and South America, and then return to the Arctic the following spring.

Shorebird Migration Strategies – Skagen et al. Figure 1— Distribution of long-distance migrating shore-birds in spring throughout midcontinental North America (reprinted with permission from Skagen et al.

challenge is to determine whether shorebirds overfly the region, congregate in alternate sites, or disperse across the by: 7. Track shorebirds as they migrate thousands of miles from their boreal breeding grounds to their wintering sites and back.

A few individuals have been fitted with either radio or satellite telemetry tags allowing us to follow their progress over species, the bar-tailed godwit, takes the longest non-stop flight of any migrant traveling up to 11, km (nearly 7, miles) from wintering.

The migration strategies used by one of the best-studied shorebird species in North America, the Western Sandpiper (Calidris mauri), have been well described for the stretch between San Francisco and western Alaska (Iverson et al. Bishop and WarnockWarnock. their migration truly amazing.

Today’s Population Scientists once thought that the Hudsonian Godwit was a rare shorebird. Today, ab birds use the Atlantic flyway, only one fifth of the total North American population. More t Hudsonian Godwits pass through James Bay, Canada in late summer on their way south.

Over 7, of. The great migration of shorebirds can be overwhelming for the novice bird-watcher. Focusing on the graceful greater yellowlegs is a good place to start. shorebirds in North America was first published in (Morrison et al.) and was motivated by the devel-opment of national shorebird conservation plans in Canada (Donaldson et al.

) and the United States (Brown et al. In addition, assessments of shorebird abundance in North America were provided to Wetlands International. Mudflats are important stopover sites for shorebirds during migration, but management plans typically do not provide mudflat habitat in the reservoirs of the Tennessee River Valley (TRV) during May—July.

In Mayflooding delayed drawdowns on Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge and created wetlands for shorebirds from May—August. We studied wetland use and behavior of Cited by: 1. Migration strategy predicts stopover ecology in shorebirds on the northern Gulf of Mexico; P.B., Waltermire, R.G., Dillon, M.B.

Biogeographical profiles of shorebird migration in midcontinental North America. Biological Science Report USGS/BRD/ BSRDenver, Cited by: 3. Focus Shorebird Migration. Rich Stallcup. In nature, migration of birds is the most astonishing and mystical event to take place on planet Earth.

Twice each year, billions of avian creatures fly vast distances south to north, then north to south, in an endless parade of beauty and magic.Partners in Flight originally was formed to emphasize conservation of species not otherwise covered by existing conservation initiatives.

Nearctic-Neotropical migratory landbirds were not included in previously existing initiatives covering waterfowl (North American Waterfowl Management Plan), shorebirds (Western Hemispheric Shorebird Reserve Network), colonial waterbirds (Colonial Waterbird.About 24% of the world’s shorebird species occur in the U.

S. and Canada; they can be found in every state and province. Of 51 shorebird species that breed in temperate, boreal, or arctic North America, most individuals of 40 species (78%) spend their winter in Latin American and Caribbean countries.